jump directly to content.
Principles. Crops. Pests. Control methods Library. Links.
key visual: online information service for Non-chemical Pest Management in the Tropics

picture discription
Photo by Jewel Kinilitan-Bissdorf



Cabbage

Scientific name: Brassica oleracea var. capitata
Family: Cruciferae


Growth stages 

 

Pests 

For weeds and diseases please see further down on this page. For rodents, snails and slugs please click here 

Seed

 
Sown seeds  Ants

Seedling Stage

 
Transplanted Seedlings  Aphids
Cabbage root maggot
Cutworm
Diamondback moth
Roots  Cabbage flea beetle
Cabbage root maggot
Stem   Cutworm
Leaves   Aphids
Cabbage flea beetle
Cutworm
Diamondback moth
Thrips

Vegetative Stage

 
Stems  Cutworm
Lygus bugs
Leaves  Aphids
Cabbage flea beetle
Cabbage webworm
Cabbage white butterfly
Cabbagehead caterpillar
Diamondback moth
Lygus bugs
Thrips

Reproductive Stage

 
Head   Cabbage flea beetle
Cabbage looper
Cabbage webworm
Cabbage white butterfly
Cabbagehead caterpillar
Diamondback moth
Lygus bugs
Thrips

Maturation stage

 
Head   Cabbage flea beetle
Cabbage looper
Cabbage webworm
Cabbagehead caterpillar
Diamondback moth
Lygus bugs
Thrips

Weeds

Grasses
Sedges
Broadleaf

Diseases

Fungal
Bacterial
Viral

Agro-ecology

Cabbage when planted 14 days after tomatoes reduces the incidence of and damage by Diamondback moth (Makumbi, 1996). Cabbage intercropped with tomato, coriander or garlic, combined with the application of neem seed kernel extract protects plants from Diamondback moth in the field (Facknath, 1996). Indian mustard (Facknath, 1997), Chinese cabbage, and radish are good trap crops for controlling cabbage webworm, flea hopper, and mustard aphid when planted in every 15 rows of cabbage. The mustard row is either in the outermost or in the middle row to avoid caterpillars being blown by wind into the cabbage plants (Muniappan; Lali, 1997). To control cabbage head caterpillar, Indian mustard should be planted 12 days before transplanting cabbage (Cornell University, 1995). Do not plant cabbage or where members of the cabbage family have been grown for 3 consecutive years to avoid serious problems of pests and diseases. Intercropping with certain combinations will have a beneficial effect on reducing pest damage in crucifer areas. Where farm size is small, seedlings covered with row covers (fine nylon mesh) prevent moths from laying eggs on the leaves and or next to the plant (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2003).

Cabbage needs plenty of nutrients. NPK is needed for head formation. However, excess nitrogen (N) may cause loose head formation and internal decay. Potassium (K) deficiency can result in marginal necrosis and lower head quality, but its excess can cause the heads to open. It has high Sulfur requirement; and is sensitive to Magnesium and Boron deficiency. During land preparation, incorporate10-20 tons of manure/ha with NPK. NPK requirements are 55-75:40-80:80-110 kg/ha on prepared beds of 1-1.2 m width and 30 cm height. The distance between beds should be about 30-40 cm. Two weeks after transplanting another side dressing of 55-75 kg/ha of N should be applied. Alternatively, the same amount can be applied in split dosages as 1-2 % solutions at 3-4 days intervals starting 1-2 weeks after transplanting. Good timing in the split N applications is important for continuous vigorous growth (Siemonsma; Piluek, 1994: pp.130-113; 181-184). However, fertilizer recommendations based on soil analyses offer the very best chances of getting the right amount of fertilizer without over or under fertilizing. Ask for assistance from the local agriculturist office for soil sampling and soil analysis procedures.

If you have access to fresh seaweeds, rinse these seaweeds to remove the salt, and then apply them as mulch. Apply kg/100 sq feet area. Seaweed is a long-term soil conditioner and growth regulator. It contains micronutrients, amino acid and enzymes plus growth hormones that stimulate plant cell division (Card, et. al., 2002).

To help control fungal disease apply compost tea made from mature-based compost. The microorganisms present in the compost tea attack the fungi that cause cabbage disease such as Botrytis blight. To make your own compost tea, place 1 gallon of well-aged compost in a 5-gallon pail and fill it with water. Stir well and leave to stand for 3 days in a warm place. Strain the mixture which is then ready for application. Remove heavily diseased leaves before application. It is better to spray late in the afternoon so that the leaves remain damp for several hours. Check affected plants every 3-4 days and repeat applications if symptoms persist (Ellis; Bradley, 1996: p. 427). n

Further information



External links


References


 to the top        PAN Germany, OISAT; Email oisat@pan-germany.org